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ENG 099 Conversational American English Textbook 1.1st Ed.

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ENG 099 Conversational American English Textbook
1.1st e-book Edition

by Charles Jeffrey Danoff

Published by Pub Dom Ed Press/Paragogy.net

Pub Dom Ed Press is an imprint of Mr. Danoff's Teaching Laboratory.

The first e-book edition of ENG 099 Conversational American English Textbook was published on September 8, 2011 by Mr. Danoff's Teaching Laboratory/Paragogy.net[1].

Attention: Pub Dom Ed Press
Mr. Danoff's Teaching Laboratory
Post Office Box 612
Winnetka, Illinois 60093-0612
United States of America

+1.315.750.9903
contact@mr.danoff.org
http://mr.danoff.org

Copyright (C) 2011, 2012 Charles Jeffrey Danoff. Ownership rights abandoned by author. Everything in this textbook is in the public domain. Re-published parts not authored by Charles are taken from resources that are in the public domain in the USA. N.B. this work does also include links to non-public domain works.


Contents

Greetings

Lesson Plan

Opening Introduce myself to new students, talk about their summer and answer student questions.

Topic This week's lesson is about American English greetings, as well as setting up the rest of the 10 week course.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."




Greetings Elicit what students know about American greetings, show video[2] on friendly greetings and then go over slowly with the slideshow[3].

Class Overview Go through how the class will work and answer any questions.

Language Talk[4]

+Teacher+.—I will pronounce these three sounds very slowly and distinctly, thus: b-u-d. Notice, it is the power, or sound, of the letter, and not its name, that I give. What did you hear?
+Pupil+.—I heard three sounds.
+T.—+Give them. I will write on the board, so that you can see them, three letters—b-u-d. Are these letters, taken separately, signs to you of anything?
+P.—+Yes, they are signs to me of the three sounds that I have just heard.
+T.—+What then do these letters, taken separately, picture to your eye?
+P.—+They picture the sounds that came to my ear.
+T+.—Letters then are the signs of what?
+P.—Letters are the signs of sounds+.
+T+.—I will pronounce the same three sounds more rapidly, uniting them more closely—bud. These sounds, so united, form a spoken word. Of what do you think when you hear the word bud?
+P+.—I think of a little round thing that grows to be a leafy branch or a flower.
+T+.—Did you see the thing when you were thinking of it?
+P+.—No.
+T+.—Then you must have had a picture of it in your mind. We call this +mental picture+ an +idea+. What called up this idea?
+P+.—It was called up by the word bud, which I heard.
+T+.—A spoken word then is the sign of what?
+P.—A spoken word is the sign of an idea+.
+T+.—I will call up the same idea in another way. I will write three letters and unite them thus: bud. What do you see?
+P+.—I see the word bud.
+T+.—If we call the other word bud a spoken word, what shall we call this?
+P+.—This is a written word.
+T+.—If they stand for the same idea, how do they differ?
+P+.—I see this, and I heard that.
+T+.—You will observe that we have called attention to four different things; viz., the +real bud+; your mental picture of the bud, which we have called an +idea+; and the +two words+, which we have called signs of this idea, the one addressed to the ear, and the other to the eye.

Tom Sawyer[5] Tom Sawyer is a famous American novel by Mark Twain. Each week we will read some of the story and talk about the work.

"TOM!"

No answer.

"TOM!"

No answer.

"What's gone with that boy, I wonder? You TOM!"

No answer.

The old lady pulled her spectacles down and looked over them about the room; then she put them up and looked out under them. She seldom or never looked THROUGH them for so small a thing as a boy; they were her state pair, the pride of her heart, and were built for "style," not service—she could have seen through a pair of stove-lids just as well. She looked perplexed for a moment, and then said, not fiercely, but still loud enough for the furniture to hear:

"Well, I lay if I get hold of you I'll—"

Please write 2 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

AAR stands for After Action Review, idea taken from [http://www.army.mil/features/FM7/FM%207-0.pdf Training the Force (FM-07)] by the US Army (2002-10-22).
Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.


Formal Telephone English

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past week and answer any questions students have.

Topic This week's lesson is about formal telephone English.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Formal Telephone English

  • Watch Learn English 4-2 : Answering the Phone YouTube video[6], stopping frequently and discussing.
  • Discuss About.com's Telephone Conversations[7] and Englishclub.com's [8] Telephone tips page.


Language Talk[4]

+Teacher+.—What did you learn in the previous Lesson?

+Pupil+.—I learned that a spoken word is composed of certain sounds, and that letters are signs of sounds, and that spoken and written words are the signs of ideas.

This question should be passed from one pupil to another till all of these answers are elicited.

All the written words in all the English books ever made, are formed of twenty-six letters, representing about forty sounds. These letters and these sounds make up what is called artificial language.

Of these twenty-six letters, +a, e, i, o, u+, and sometimes +w+ and +y+, are called +vowels+, and the remainder are called +consonants+.

In order that you may understand what kind of sounds the vowels stand for, and what kinds the consonants represent, I will tell you something about the human voice.

The air breathed out from your lungs beats against two flat muscles, stretched like strings across the top of the windpipe, and causes them to vibrate. This vibrating makes sound. Take a thread, put one end between your teeth, hold the other in your fingers, draw it tight and strike it, and you will understand how voice is made.

If the voice thus produced comes out through the mouth held well open, a class of sounds is formed which we call vowel sounds.

But, if the voice is held back by your palate, tongue, teeth, or lips, one kind of consonant sounds is made. If the breath is driven out without voice, and is held back by these same parts of the mouth, the other kind of consonant sounds is formed. Ex. of both: b, d, g; p, t, k.

The teacher and pupils should practice on these sounds till the three kinds can easily be distinguished.

You are now prepared to understand what I mean when I say that the +vowels+ are the +letters+ which stand for the +open sounds of the voice+, and that the +consonants+ are the +letters+ which stand for the sounds made by the +obstructed voice+ and the +obstructed breath+.

The teacher can here profitably spend a few minutes in showing how ideas may be communicated by Natural Language, the language of sighs, groans, gestures of the hands, attitudes of the body, expressions of the face, tones of the voice, etc. He can show that, in conversation, we sometimes couple this Natural Language of tone and gesture with our language of words, in order to make a stronger impression. Let the pupil be told that, if the passage contain feeling, he should do the same in Reading and Declaiming.

Let the following definitions be learned, and given at the next recitation.

+DEFINITION.—Artificial Language, or Language Proper, consists of the spoken and written words used to communicate ideas and thoughts+.

+DEFINITION.—English Grammar is the science which teaches the forms, uses, and relations of the words of the English Language+.

Tom Sawyer[5]

She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom, and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with. She resurrected nothing but the cat.

"I never did see the beat of that boy!"

She went to the open door and stood in it and looked out among the tomato vines and "jimpson" weeds that constituted the garden. No Tom. So she lifted up her voice at an angle calculated for distance and shouted:

"Y-o-u-u TOM!"

There was a slight noise behind her and she turned just in time to seize a small boy by the slack of his roundabout and arrest his flight.

"There! I might 'a' thought of that closet. What you been doing in there?"

"Nothing."

"Nothing! Look at your hands. And look at your mouth. What IS that truck?"

"I don't know, aunt."

"Well, I know. It's jam—that's what it is. Forty times I've said if you didn't let that jam alone I'd skin you. Hand me that switch."

Please write 2 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.



Informal Telephone English

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past week and answer any questions students have.

Topic This week's lesson is about informal telephone English.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."




Informal Telephone English For a check-in call to a friend nearby, i.e. "Wacha doin'?" Go through an example call made between two American friends and have the students act it out.

Language Talk[4]

Let the pupils be required to tell what they learned in the previous lessons.

+Teacher+.—When I pronounce the two words star and bud thus: star bud, how many ideas, or mental pictures, do I call up to you?

+Pupil+.—Two.

+T+.—Do you see any connection between these ideas?

+P+.—No.

+T+.—When I utter the two words bud and swelling, thus: bud swelling, do you see any connection in the ideas they stand for?

+P+.—Yes, I imagine that I see a bud expanding, or growing larger.

+T+.—I will connect two words more closely, so as to express a thought: Buds swell. A thought has been formed in my mind when I say, Buds swell; and these two words, in which something is said of something else, express that thought, and make what we call a sentence. In the former expression, bud swelling it is assumed, or taken for granted, that buds perform the act; in the latter, the swelling is asserted as a fact.

Leaves falling. Do these two words express two ideas merely associated, or do they express a thought?

+P+.—They express ideas merely associated.

+T+.—Leaves fall.

Same question.

+P+.—A thought.

+T+.—Why?

+P+.—Because, in these words, there is something said or asserted of leaves.

+T+.—When I say, Falling leaves rustle, does falling tell what is thought of leaves?

+P+.—No.

+T+.—What does falling do?

+P+.—It tells the kind of leaves you are thinking and speaking of.

+T+.—What word does tell what is thought of leaves?

+P+.—Rustle.

+T+.—You see then that in the thought there are two parts; something of which we think, and that which we think about it.

Let the pupils give other examples.

Tom Sawyer[5]

The switch hovered in the air—the peril was desperate—

"My! Look behind you, aunt!"

The old lady whirled round, and snatched her skirts out of danger. The lad fled on the instant, scrambled up the high board-fence, and disappeared over it.

His aunt Polly stood surprised a moment, and then broke into a gentle laugh.

Please write 3 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.



Restaurant Menus

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past week and answer any questions students have.


Topic This week's lesson is about restaurant menus.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Restaurant Menus Elicit how to order at restaurants with menus from local places and/or fast food joints.

Language Talk[4]

Commit to memory all definitions.

+DEFINITION.—A Sentence is the expression of a thought in words+.

Which of the following expressions contain words that have no connection, which contain words merely associated, and which are sentences?

1. Flowers bloom. 2. Ice melts. 3. Bloom ice. 4. Grass grows. 5. Brooks babble. 6. Babbling brooks. 7. Grass soar. 8. Doors open. 9. Open doors. 10. Cows graze. 11. Curling smoke. 12. Sugar graze. 13. Dew sparkles. 14. Hissing serpents. 15. Smoke curls. 16. Serpents hiss. 17. Smoke curling. 18. Serpents sparkles. 19. Melting babble. 20. Eagles soar. 21. Birds chirping. 22. Birds are chirping. 23. Birds chirp. 24. Gentle cows. 25. Eagles are soaring. 26. Bees ice. 27. Working bees. 28. Bees work. 29. Crawling serpents. 30. Landscape piano. 31. Serpents crawl. 32. Eagles clock. 33. Serpents crawling.

Tom Sawyer[5]

"Hang the boy, can't I never learn anything? Ain't he played me tricks enough like that for me to be looking out for him by this time? But old fools is the biggest fools there is. Can't learn an old dog new tricks, as the saying is. But my goodness, he never plays them alike, two days, and how is a body to know what's coming? He 'pears to know just how long he can torment me before I get my dander up, and he knows if he can make out to put me off for a minute or make me laugh, it's all down again and I can't hit him a lick. I ain't doing my duty by that boy, and that's the Lord's truth, goodness knows. Spare the rod and spile the child, as the Good Book says. I'm a laying up sin and suffering for us both, I know. He's full of the Old Scratch, but laws-a-me! he's my own dead sister's boy, poor thing, and I ain't got the heart to lash him, somehow. Every time I let him off, my conscience does hurt me so, and every time I hit him my old heart most breaks. Well-a-well, man that is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble, as the Scripture says, and I reckon it's so. He'll play hookey this evening, * and [* Southwestern for "afternoon"] I'll just be obleeged to make him work, tomorrow, to punish him. It's mighty hard to make him work Saturdays, when all the boys is having holiday, but he hates work more than he hates anything else, and I've GOT to do some of my duty by him, or I'll be the ruination of the child."

Please write 3 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




Government Forms

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past week and answer any questions students have.

Topic This week's lesson is about forms for the US Government.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Government Forms Start with IRS Form 1040[9] and go through it together as a class.

Language Talk[4]

Illustrate, by the use of a, b, and p, the difference between the sounds of letters and their names. Letters are the signs of what? What is an idea? A spoken word is the sign of what? A written word is the sign of what? How do they differ? To what four different things did we call attention in Lesson 1?

How are vowel sounds made? How are the two kinds of consonant sounds made? What are vowels? Name them. What are consonants? What is artificial language, or language proper? What do you understand by natural language? What is English grammar?

What three kinds of expressions are spoken of in Lessons 3 and 4? Give examples of each. What is a sentence?

Tom Sawyer[5]

Tom did play hookey, and he had a very good time. He got back home barely in season to help Jim, the small colored boy, saw next-day's wood and split the kindlings before supper—at least he was there in time to tell his adventures to Jim while Jim did three-fourths of the work. Tom's younger brother (or rather half-brother) Sid was already through with his part of the work (picking up chips), for he was a quiet boy, and had no adventurous, trouble-some ways.

While Tom was eating his supper, and stealing sugar as opportunity offered, Aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile, and very deep—for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments. Like many other simple-hearted souls, it was her pet vanity to believe she was endowed with a talent for dark and mysterious diplomacy, and she loved to contemplate her most transparent devices as marvels of low cunning. Said she:

Please write 4 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.



Reading American Fiction

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about past week and answer any questions students have.

Topic This week's lesson is about how to read American fiction.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Reading American Fiction Vladimir Nabokov is a famous Russian novelist who taught at American Universities in the 20th century. We will read some of his lecture "Good Readers and Good Writers" [10] to think about how we can read American fiction.

Language Talk[4]

On the following sentences, let the pupils be exercised according to the model.

+Model+.—Intemperance degrades. Why is this a sentence? Ans.—Because it expresses a thought. Of what is something thought? Ans.—Intemperance. Which word tells what is thought? Ans.—Degrades.

1. Magnets attract. 2. Horses neigh. 3. Frogs leap. 4. Cold contracts. 5. Sunbeams dance. 6. Heat expands. 7. Sunlight gleams. 8. Banners wave. 9. Grass withers. 10. Sailors climb. 11. Rabbits burrow. 12. Spring advances.

You see that in these sentences there are two parts. The parts are the +Subject+ and the +Predicate+.

+DEFINITION.—The Subject of a sentence names that of which something is thought+.

+DEFINITION.—The Predicate of a sentence tells what is thought+.

+DEFINITION.—The Analysis of a sentence is the separation of it into its parts+.

Analyze, according to the model, the following sentences.

+Model+.—Stars twinkle. This is a sentence, because it expresses a thought. Stars is the subject, because it names that of which something is thought; twinkle is the predicate, because it tells what is thought.

+To the Teacher+.—After the pupils become familiar with the definitions, the "Models" may be varied, and some of the reasons maybe made specific; as, "Plants names the things we tell about; droop tells what plants do," etc.

Guard against needless repetition.

1. Plants droop. 2. Books help. 3. Clouds float. 4. Exercise strengthens. 5. Rain falls. 6. Time flies. 7. Rowdies fight. 8. Bread nourishes. 9. Boats capsize. 10. Water flows. 11. Students learn. 12. Horses gallop.

Tom Sawyer[5]

"Tom, it was middling warm in school, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Powerful warm, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Didn't you want to go in a-swimming, Tom?"

A bit of a scare shot through Tom—a touch of uncomfortable suspicion. He searched Aunt Polly's face, but it told him nothing. So he said:

"No'm—well, not very much."

The old lady reached out her hand and felt Tom's shirt, and said:

"But you ain't too warm now, though." And it flattered her to reflect that she had discovered that the shirt was dry without anybody knowing that that was what she had in her mind. But in spite of her, Tom knew where the wind lay, now. So he forestalled what might be the next move:

"Some of us pumped on our heads—mine's damp yet. See?"

Aunt Polly was vexed to think she had overlooked that bit of circumstantial evidence, and missed a trick. Then she had a new inspiration:

"Tom, you didn't have to undo your shirt collar where I sewed it, to pump on your head, did you? Unbutton your jacket!"

Please write 4 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




Writing American English Primer

Lesson Plan

Opening

Topic This week we are going to introduce how to write American English.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Writing American English Primer The book The Elements of Style [11] by William Strunk is one of the most famous books on writing American English. We will read a short section and talk about it.

Make the paragraph the unit of composition: one paragraph to each topic.

If the subject on which you are writing is of slight extent, or if you intend to treat it very briefly, there may be no need of subdividing it into topics. Thus a brief description, a brief summary of a literary work, a brief account of a single incident, a narrative merely outlining an action, the setting forth of a single idea, any one of these is best written in a single paragraph. After the paragraph has been written, examine it to see whether subdivision will not improve it.

Ordinarily, however, a subject requires subdivision into topics, each of which should be made the subject of a paragraph. The object of treating each topic in a paragraph by itself is, of course, to aid the reader. The beginning of each paragraph is a signal to him that a new step in the development of the subject has been reached.

The extent of subdivision will vary with the length of the composition. For example, a short notice of a book or poem might consist of a single paragraph. One slightly longer might consist of two paragraphs:

A. Account of the work. B. Critical discussion.

A report on a poem, written for a class in literature, might consist of seven paragraphs:

A. Facts of composition and publication. B. Kind of poem; metrical form. C. Subject. D. Treatment of subject. E. For what chiefly remarkable. F. Wherein characteristic of the writer. G. Relationship to other works.

The contents of paragraphs C and D would vary with the poem. Usually, paragraph C would indicate the actual or imagined circumstances of the poem (the situation), if these call for explanation, and would then state the subject and outline its development. If the poem is a narrative in the third person throughout, paragraph C need contain no more than a concise summary of the action. Paragraph D would indicate the leading ideas and show how they are made prominent, or would indicate what points in the narrative are chiefly emphasized.

A novel might be discussed under the heads:

A. Setting. B. Plot. C. Characters. D. Purpose.

An historical event might be discussed under the heads:

A. What led up to the event. B. Account of the event. C. What the event led up to.

In treating either of these last two subjects, the writer would probably find it necessary to subdivide one or more of the topics here given.

As a rule, single sentences should not be written or printed as paragraphs. An exception may be made of sentences of transition, indicating the relation between the parts of an exposition or argument. Frequent exceptions are also necessary in textbooks, guidebooks, and other works in which many topics are treated briefly.

In dialogue, each speech, even if only a single word, is a paragraph by itself; that is, a new paragraph begins with each change of speaker. The application of this rule, when dialogue and narrative are combined, is best learned from examples in well-printed works of fiction.

Tom Sawyer[5]

The trouble vanished out of Tom's face. He opened his jacket. His shirt collar was securely sewed.

"Bother! Well, go 'long with you. I'd made sure you'd played hookey and been a-swimming. But I forgive ye, Tom. I reckon you're a kind of a singed cat, as the saying is—better'n you look. THIS time."

She was half sorry her sagacity had miscarried, and half glad that Tom had stumbled into obedient conduct for once.

But Sidney said:

"Well, now, if I didn't think you sewed his collar with white thread, but it's black."

"Why, I did sew it with white! Tom!"

But Tom did not wait for the rest. As he went out at the door he said:

"Siddy, I'll lick you for that."

In a safe place Tom examined two large needles which were thrust into the lapels of his jacket, and had thread bound about them—one needle carried white thread and the other black. He said:

"She'd never noticed if it hadn't been for Sid. Confound it! sometimes she sews it with white, and sometimes she sews it with black. I wish to gee-miny she'd stick to one or t'other—I can't keep the run of 'em. But I bet you I'll lam Sid for that. I'll learn him!"

He was not the Model Boy of the village. He knew the model boy very well though—and loathed him.

Please write 5 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




The Job Interview 1

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about the past week and answer any student questions.

Topic Go over how to do a job interview with an American company.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Job Interview Start by going over some basic interview questions:

  • Tell us about yourself.
  • Why do you want this job?
  • Why should we hire you?
  • What's a difficult situation you've overcome?
  • What are your weaknesses?

Go over the interview video[12] and answer student questions.

Language Talk[4]

ANALYSIS AND THE DIAGRAM.

+Hints for Oral Instruction+.—I will draw on the board a heavy, or shaded, line, and divide it into two parts, thus:

We will consider the first part as the sign of the subject of a sentence, and the second part as the sign of the predicate of a sentence.

Now, if I write a word over the first line, thus—(doing it)—you will understand that that word is the subject of a sentence. If I write a word over the second line, thus—you will understand that that word is the predicate of a sentence. Planets | revolve

The class can see by this picture that Planets revolve is a sentence, that planets is the subject, and that revolve is the predicate.

These signs, or illustrations, made up of straight lines, we call

+Diagrams+.

+DEFINITION.—A Diagram is a picture of the offices and relations of the different parts of a sentence+.

Analyze and diagram the following sentences.

1. Waves dash. 2. Kings reign. 3. Fruit ripens. 4. Stars shine. 5. Steel tarnishes. 6. Insects buzz. 7. Paul preached. 8. Poets sing. 9. Nero fiddled. 10. Larks sing. 11. Water ripples. 12. Lambs frisk. 13. Lions roar. 14. Tigers growl. 15. Breezes sigh. 16. Carthage fell. 17. Morning dawns. 18. Showers descended. 19. Diamonds sparkle. 20. Alexander conquered. 21. Jupiter thunders. 22. Columbus sailed, 23. Grammarians differ. 24. Cornwallis surrendered.

Tom Sawyer[5]

Within two minutes, or even less, he had forgotten all his troubles. Not because his troubles were one whit less heavy and bitter to him than a man's are to a man, but because a new and powerful interest bore them down and drove them out of his mind for the time—just as men's misfortunes are forgotten in the excitement of new enterprises. This new interest was a valued novelty in whistling, which he had just acquired from a negro, and he was suffering to practise it un-disturbed. It consisted in a peculiar bird-like turn, a sort of liquid warble, produced by touching the tongue to the roof of the mouth at short intervals in the midst of the music—the reader probably remembers how to do it, if he has ever been a boy. Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it, and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude. He felt much as an astronomer feels who has discovered a new planet—no doubt, as far as strong, deep, unalloyed pleasure is concerned, the advantage was with the boy, not the astronomer.

The summer evenings were long. It was not dark, yet. Presently Tom checked his whistle. A stranger was before him—a boy a shade larger than himself. A new-comer of any age or either sex was an im-pressive curiosity in the poor little shabby village of St. Petersburg. This boy was well dressed, too—well dressed on a week-day. This was simply as- tounding. His cap was a dainty thing, his close-buttoned blue cloth roundabout was new and natty, and so were his pantaloons. He had shoes on—and it was only Friday. He even wore a necktie, a bright bit of ribbon. He had a citified air about him that ate into Tom's vitals. The more Tom stared at the splendid marvel, the higher he turned up his nose at his finery and the shabbier and shabbier his own outfit seemed to him to grow. Neither boy spoke. If one moved, the other moved—but only sidewise, in a circle; they kept face to face and eye to eye all the time. Finally Tom said:

"I can lick you!"

"I'd like to see you try it."

Please write 5 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




The Job Interview 2

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past weeks and answer any student questions.

Topic We will expand upon the job interview and practice.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Job Interview Review what we did last week and have students do mock job interviews of each other.

Language Talk[4]

SENTENCE-BUILDING.

You have now learned to analyze sentences, that is, to separate them into their parts. You must next learn to put these parts together, that is, to build sentences.

We will find one part, and you must find the other and do the building.

+To the Teacher+.—Let some of the pupils write their sentences on the board, while others are reading theirs. Then let the work on the board be corrected.

Correct any expression that does not make good sense, or that asserts something not strictly true; for the pupil should early be taught to think accurately, as well as to write and speak grammatically.

Correct all mistakes in spelling, and in the use of capital letters and the period.

Call attention to the agreement in form of the predicate with the subject. See Notes, p. 163.

Insist on neatness. Collect the papers before the recitation closes.

+CAPITAL LETTER-RULE.—The first word of every sentence must begin with a capital letter+.

+PERIOD—RULE.—A period must be placed after every sentence that simply affirms, denies, or expresses a command+.

Construct sentences by supplying a subject to each of the following predicates.

Ask yourself the question, What swim, sink, hunt, etc.?

1. —— swim. 2. —— sinks. 3. —— hunt. 4. —— skate. 5. —— jingle. 6. —— decay. 7. —— climb. 8. —— creep. 9. —— run. 10. —— walk. 11. —— snort. 12. —— kick. 13. —— flashes. 14. —— flutters. 15. —— paddle. 16. —— toil. 17. —— terrifies. 18. —— rages. 19. —— expand. 20. —— jump. 21. —— hop. 22. —— bellow. 23. —— burns. 24. —— evaporates.

This exercise may profitably be extended by requiring the pupils to supply several subjects to each predicate.

Tom Sawyer[5]

"Well, I can do it."

"No you can't, either."

"Yes I can."

"No you can't."

"I can."

"You can't."

"Can!"

"Can't!"

An uncomfortable pause. Then Tom said:

"What's your name?"

"'Tisn't any of your business, maybe."

"Well I 'low I'll MAKE it my business."

"Well why don't you?"

"If you say much, I will."

"Much—much—MUCH. There now."

"Oh, you think you're mighty smart, DON'T you? I could lick you with one hand tied behind me, if I wanted to."

"Well why don't you DO it? You SAY you can do it."

"Well I WILL, if you fool with me."

"Oh yes—I've seen whole families in the same fix."

"Smarty! You think you're SOME, now, DON'T you? Oh, what a hat!"

"You can lump that hat if you don't like it. I dare you to knock it off—and anybody that'll take a dare will suck eggs."

"You're a liar!"

"You're another."

"You're a fighting liar and dasn't take it up."

"Aw—take a walk!"

"Say—if you give me much more of your sass I'll take and bounce a rock off'n your head."

"Oh, of COURSE you will."

"Well I WILL."

"Well why don't you DO it then? What do you keep SAYING you will for? Why don't you DO it? It's because you're afraid."

"I AIN'T afraid."

"You are."

"I ain't."

"You are."

Please write 5 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Next Time Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next week.

Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




Review

Lesson Plan

Opening Chat about our past week and answer any student questions.

Topic Review the past 9 weeks.

Goals Students write on board, "My goal today is _______."



Review Ask students what they would like to cover again, and get feedback in general on the course.

Language Talk[4]

SENTENCE-BUILDING—Continued.

Construct sentences by supplying a predicate to each of the following subjects.

Ask yourself the question, Artists do what?

1. Artists ——. 2. Sailors ——. 3. Tides ——. 4. Whales ——. 5. Gentlemen ——. 6. Swine ——. 7. Clouds ——. 8. Girls ——. 9. Fruit ——. 10. Powder ——. 11. Hail ——. 12. Foxes ——. 13. Water ——. 14. Frost ——. 15. Man ——. 16. Blood ——. 17. Kings ——. 18. Lilies ——. 19. Roses ——. 20. Wheels ——. 21. Waves ——. 22. Dew ——. 23. Boys ——. 24. Volcanoes ——. 25. Storms ——. 26. Politicians ——. 27. Serpents ——. 28. Chimneys ——. 29. Owls ——. 30. Rivers ——. 31. Nations ——. 32. Indians ——. 33. Grain ——. 34. Rogues ——. 34. Volcanoes ——. 35. Rome ——. 36. Briars ——.

This exercise may be extended by requiring the pupils to supply several predicates to each subject.

Tom Sawyer[5]

Another pause, and more eying and sidling around each other. Presently they were shoulder to shoulder. Tom said:

"Get away from here!"

"Go away yourself!"

"I won't."

"I won't either."

So they stood, each with a foot placed at an angle as a brace, and both shoving with might and main, and glowering at each other with hate. But neither could get an advantage. After struggling till both were hot and flushed, each relaxed his strain with watchful caution, and Tom said:

"You're a coward and a pup. I'll tell my big brother on you, and he can thrash you with his little finger, and I'll make him do it, too."

"What do I care for your big brother? I've got a brother that's bigger than he is—and what's more, he can throw him over that fence, too." [Both brothers were imaginary.]

"That's a lie."

"YOUR saying so don't make it so."

Tom drew a line in the dust with his big toe, and said:

"I dare you to step over that, and I'll lick you till you can't stand up. Anybody that'll take a dare will steal sheep."

The new boy stepped over promptly, and said:

"Now you said you'd do it, now let's see you do it."

"Don't you crowd me now; you better look out."

"Well, you SAID you'd do it—why don't you do it?"

"By jingo! for two cents I WILL do it."

The new boy took two broad coppers out of his pocket and held them out with derision. Tom struck them to the ground. In an instant both boys were rolling and tumbling in the dirt, gripped together like cats; and for the space of a minute they tugged and tore at each other's hair and clothes, punched and scratched each other's nose, and covered themselves with dust and glory. Presently the confusion took form, and through the fog of battle Tom appeared, seated astride the new boy, and pounding him with his fists. "Holler 'nuff!" said he.

The boy only struggled to free himself. He was crying—mainly from rage.

"Holler 'nuff!"—and the pounding went on.

At last the stranger got out a smothered "'Nuff!" and Tom let him up and said:

"Now that'll learn you. Better look out who you're fooling with next time."

Please write 5 sentences with your opinion on what you just read.







Extra Time Student questions, game or student directed activities.

AAR

Review what was supposed to happen.

Establish what happened.

Determine what was right or wrong with what happened.

Determine how the task should be done differently the next time.




Notes

  1. Note the first e-book edition was published by Mr. Danoff's Teaching Laboratory, not the Neo-Hogarth Press. The Neo-Hogarth Press was a fictitious division of the Lab that was never actually created, it was intended only as an Homage to my favorite author Virginia Woolf's famous "Hogarth Press" and had no connection whatsoever with the actual Hogarth Press. Copies of the first ed. were only available for free download online and given for free to some of my students.
  2. ESL 101 Conversational American English Lesson 1 Greetings http://www.archive.org/details/Esl101ConversationalAmericanEnglishLesson1Greetings by Charles Jeffrey Danoff. Published on the Internet Archive. Public Domain.
  3. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ESL_101_Lesson_1_Image_0.jpg (Change the last number of the URL from 0 - 14 to see all the images). All images are Public Domain.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 Graded Lessons in English An Elementary English Grammar Consisting of One Hundred Practical Lessons, Carefully Graded and Adapted to the Class-Room. Author: Alonzo Reed and Brainerd Kellogg. http://archive.org/details/gradedlessonsin06kellgoog
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Complete by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Wikisource:Books/The_Adventures_of_Tom_Sawyer
  6. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj2Yo0e8PO4
  7. About.com's Telephone Conversations: http://esl.about.com/od/businessspeakingskills/a/Telephone-Conversations.htm
  8. http://www.englishclub.com/speaking/telephone_tips.htm
  9. http://www.irs.gov/formspubs/index.html
  10. http://www.en.utexas.edu/amlit/amlitprivate/scans/goodre.html
  11. The Elements of Style by William Strunk http://codeblab.com/elos/
  12. How to Prepare for a Job Interview : How to Answer Job Interview Questions http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCQdloL8HV0